Jackson Heights Buildings


ARLINGTON HALL, 79-01 35th Avenue
Built in 1939, architect was Joshua Tabatchnik, the six-story-and-basement Arlington Hall is among the later apartment buildings erected in the historic district. Typical of that phase of development, the building occupies a site on 35th Avenue and is planned with a shallow recess at the avenue façade containing the entrance and a deep lightcourt at the side facing 79th Street.

Designed in the neo-Georgian style, the brick building features double-height temple front motifs at the upper stories, culminating in pediments with blind oculi at die roofline; brick laid to suggest quoins; brick dentil courses; broken pediments at first-story windows; and a window above the entrance with a Palladian motif. The original entrance has been replaced. Balconies have been removed from sixth-story windows (the brackets remain). Buildings Department Records


THE BELVEDERE, 84-12 35th Avenue
Built in 1936-37 to designs by Joshua Tabatchnik, the Belvedere is among the later apartment buildings erected in the historic district. Typical of that phase of development, the large building occupies an endblock site on 35th Avenue and is planned with a shallow central entrance pavilion and two recessed. Light courts on the avenue front and one lightcourt at each of the street fronts on 84th and 85th streets.

Faced in brick with stone trim, the building is neo-Romanesque in style. The six-story-and-basement structure is complex in its massing, having towers of various forms, gabled end bays, and projecting angled bays in the lightcourts. The square towers flanking the entrance pavilion on 35th Avenue are pierced by arcaded loggias and topped with red tile roofs on bracketed eaves. Polygonal towers and smaller square towers flank the lightcourts on the side streets. The arcaded entrance porch, with its tiled 35th Avenue — South Side page 99 roof, shelters an arched stone doorway containing glass double-doors with iron grilles. Other elements of Romanesque inspiration include round-arched windows in stone enframements with engaged colonnettes, stone balconettes, patterned brickwork, corbels, and corner quoins.


BERKELEY GARDENS, 35-25 77th Street
Built in 1936-37, architect was Joshua Tabatchnik, the six-story-and-basement Berkeley Gardens (formerly known as Berkeley Hall) is among the later apartment buildings erected in the historic district. Typical of that phase of development, the building occupies an end-block site on 35th Avenue and is planned with two lightcourts flanking a slightly recessed central gabled pavilion at the front and lightcourts at the sides.

The central pavilion and the flanking courts are modulated with angled bays. The building is roughly contemporary with the Berkeley Apartments, also designed by Tabatchnik, which is located around the corner on 77th Street.

Faced in red brick with white trim, the building is neo-Georgian in style. A two-story wooden portico marks the entrance; a similar motif in stone, consisting of paired pilasters supporting an architrave, is repeated on the facades of the flanking sections on the avenue. Other neo-Georgian elements include the pitched roof with gabled dormers, pediments, and urns; brickwork imitating quoins and brick band courses; three-sided oriels at some second-story bays; and the false fanlight above the entrance. Building Department Records


CARLTON HOUSE, 79-01 35th Avenue
Designed by Philip Birnbaum and built in 1946-47, the six-story Carlton House is one of several apartment buildings constructed in the post-World War II era of development in Jackson Heights.

Continuing the trend of the pre-War years, it is a large building planned with lightcourts which break up the mass into five sections. This configuration suggests a cohesive group of buildings along the blockfront, reminiscent of the Jackson Heights garden apartments of the 1920s. There is a parking garage under the building (vehicular entrance at each end) and a small front garden.

A late interpretation of the Modern style, the brick building is distinguished by the horizontal emphasis of its massing, particularly evident in the deep center and corner terraces trimmed with brick courses and white coping. Building is entered at the central section through a polished metal and marble frontispiece with a geometric metal marquee. There are also a few classicizing ornamental elements, including applied stone acanthus leaves and fretwork panels.


CHATEAU, 34-05 80th St / 34-13 80th St / 34-21 80th St / 34-29 80th St / 34-37 80th St / 34-47 80th St • 34-06 81st St / 34-14 81st St / 34-22 81st St / 34-30 81st St / 34-48 81st St
The Chateau, built in 1922 to designs by Andrew J. Thomas, is one of the Queensboro Corporation’s early garden apartment complexes in Jackson Heights. Occupying most of the block, the complex consists of twelve freestanding U-shaped buildings, six along each block front, which are situated back to back across a common landscaped garden at the interior of the block. The large garden opens onto 34th Avenue and is clearly visible from the street. The three street fronts around the complex are also lined with gardens. The passageways between the buildings are spanned by brick walls and iron entrance gates.

Each blockfront of six brick buildings with masonry trim is arranged in a “A-B-C-C-B-A” pattern. The outer buildings (“A”) are asymmetrically massed, each with a five-story section at the center flanked by a six-story projecting section and a corner tower; the towers mark the ends of die complex. The (“B”) buildings are symmetrical five-story buildings with flush facades, while the center buildings (“C”) are mirror images with slightly projecting sections which mark the center of the block.

The style of the Chateau, derived from French Renaissance architecture, has been described as “reminiscent of die architecture of Henri IV of France.” Particularly suggestive of this inspiration are the imposing slate mansard roofs with dormers and finials; the Flemish bond brick facing and the decorative banding; the diaperwork patterning on the towers of the “A” buildings; the brick chimneys with decorative tops; and the stone entry portals, flanked by decorative colonnettes and capped by hoods.

The segmentally-arched door openings contain glass doors with decorative iron grilles. The original doors survive. Almost all of the original four-over-four double-hung wood sash windows survive, as do most of die multi-pane wood casement windows.


COLONIAL COURT, 35-36 76th Street


COLTON, 76-15 35th Avenue


DUNOLLY GARDENS, 78-11 35th Avenue
Constructed in 1938-39 and designed by Andrew J. Thomas, an architect who two decades earlier had been a pioneer in designing garden apartment complexes in Jackson Heights, Dunolly Gardens was the last such project built within the historic district. The complex consists of six large freestanding buildings – two on each street and one on each avenue – arranged around a large common garden at the interior of the block. It is the only complex in the district to occupy an entire block, including both avenue ends.

Each six-story-and-basement brick building, U-shaped in plan, is sited with a broad, simply landscaped entrance court at the front. The massing is further modulated by stepped bay projections in the courtyards and by asymmetrical Hghtcourts at the sides of the buildings. Passageways between the buildings provide views into the garden from the street.

The six buildings in the complex are nearly identical; the notable difference between the two buildings on the avenue fronts and the four buildings on the street fronts is in the treatment of the entrance courts.

The spare Moderne design of Dunolly Gardens contrasts with the historically-based designs of Thomas’s earlier complexes in the district, among them the The Chateau and The Towers, located nearby. The modulated and sharply-angled massing, the brick banding and geometric patterning, the corner window openings, and the entrance bays which incorporate brick piers rising above the roofline (avenue buildings) or vertical brick channels culminating in angled parapets (street buildings) are all characteristic of the Moderne style. The entrance doors have horizontal glass panes which continue the streamline aesthetic.


THE ELBERTSON, 79-15 35th Avenue


ELM COURT, 34-27 79th St/34-28 80th St/34-35 79th St/34-36 80th St/34-41 79th St/34-42 80th St/34-43-34-49 79th St/34-50 80th St
Elm Court, built in 1921-22 and designed by George H. Wells, is one of the characteristic garden apartment projects in Jackson Heights. The through-the-block complex consists of eight four-story-and-basement buildings, arranged with four contiguous buildings on each blockfront, situated back-to-back across a wide common garden. Elm Court, like almost all of Wells’s garden apartment complexes, is neo-Georgian in style. The brick facades are laid in Flemish bond and have stone trim. Neo-Georgian elements include classically-inspired brick and stone entrance porticoes crowned by balustrades; brick banding at the basement and brick quoins at the slightly projecting central section of each facade; bandcourses, sills, and splayed lintels with keystones, all of stone; arched window openings at the top level of each central stairhall bay; and modillioned cornices with roofline balustrades. The projecting entrances—a hallmark of Wells’s work—have short stoops.

The wood-and-glass entrance doors are set into openings with elliptical fanlights and sidelights, both of leaded glass. All of the original entrances survive, as do the original six-over-one


HAMPTON COURT, 35-15 78th St, 35-25 78th St, 35-31 78th St, 35-37 78th St, 35-45 78th St, 35-55 78th St
The Hampton Court Apartments, built in 1919-21 and designed by George H. Wells, is one of the early garden apartment projects in Jackson Heights. The complex, which occupies almost the entire block, consists of eleven five-story-and-basement walk-up buildings grouped around a common garden. Originally garden areas also occupied the open ends of the block. Today, the interior garden is accessible through passageways at the end of each blockfront of apartments. While similar, the six structures on 78th Street and the five on 79th Street are not identical. Each of the 78th Street buildings has a six-baywide facade with the four central bays slightly projecting, and an asymmetrically placed entrance. The 79th Street buildings have centrally-placed entrances and flanking, three-sided projecting bays.

Hampton Court, like almost all of Wells’s garden apartment complexes, is neo-Georgian in style. The red brick facades are laid in Flemish bond and have white stone trim. Georgian-inspired elements include continuous stone stringcourses, mod il Honed cornices on 78th Street, and brick parapets with stone openwork panels on 79th Street. The entrances are within arched stone surrounds with flanking metal lamps; on 79th Street, the entrances are set within stone entablatures. The double doors are metal and glass with transoms and brass hardware. The round-headed and tripartite windows are typically neo-Georgian. All of the multi-pane double-hung wood sash, painted white, are original. The stoop railings and balconies on 78th Street appear to be recent additions.


THE TOWERS, 33-52 81st St, 33-40 81st St33-28 81st St33-16 81st St33-51 80th St, 35-39 80th St, 35-27 80th St, 35-15 80th St,   
The Towers, built in 1923-25 to designs by Andrew J. Thomas, is one of the Queensboro Corporation’s early garden apartment complexes in Jackson Heights. Occupying most of the block, the complex consists of eight freestanding U-shaped buildings, four along each blockfront, which are situated back-toback across a common landscaped garden at the interior of the block. The garden is opens onto 34th Avenue and is clearly visible from the street. The three street fronts around the complex are also lined with gardens and iron fences. The passageways between the buildings are spanned by brick walls and entrance gates.

Each blockfront of four six-story brick buildings with masonry trim is arranged in a “A-B-B-A” pattern. The inner buildings (“B”) are symmetrically massed and have prominent entrances at the center, while the outer buildings (“A”) are asymmetrically massed and have corner towers marking the ends of the complex. The style of the Towers is derived from Italian Romanesque and Renaissance architecture. Particularly suggestive of this inspiration are the palazzo-like massing; the red tile roofs with overhanging eaves; the arcaded sixth-story loggias and tower belvederes (“A”); the round attic-story windows (“A”); and the arched stone entrance surrounds which are either keyed (“A”) or rusticated (“B”) and topped by cartouches. Other notable features include the iron and glass double doors with fanlights, decorative bandcourses, stone trim at the towers and loggias, balustraded balconettes, and large stone griffons flanking the iron gates leading to the interior garden.

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